Page 1 of 1

Definition of "Wilderness" for Monsters

Posted: Mon May 11, 2020 10:23 pm
by Zettonsperson
THis is just something that has not been sitting well with me.

Wilderness, as a habitat for monsters, is defined in the Pit books as "means large dead areas, which are rocky and
desolate, such as the Wastes of Chaos."

This definition, however, is more accurately reflected in the word "Wasteland", because Wilderness, to me, at least, is any area beyond civilisation.
Now, I'm a Solo, and I can do whatever I want, but it seemed neighbourly to provide my personal definition of Wilderness.

In game terms, Wilderness can mean any area, in any environment, beyond the control of a permanent settlement, following the traditional definition of "civilisation".
Thus, if an area is, say, beyond one day's ride from a permanent settlement, a reasonable control distance, it can be defined as wilderness, and Wilderness monsters of all varieties can and will be found there, alongside the usual monsters of the environment. Thus, the Aakor, not traditionally native to the Plains, could still hunt the Flatlands alongside traditional wolves in the lands outside my Lordship of Zetton's control. It just gives more variety to the monsters one might encounter.

Wastelands, of course, not being occupied by permanent settlements of any sort, would accurately fall into this definition of Wilderness, tying things up nicely.

Re: Definition of "Wilderness" for Monsters

Posted: Tue May 12, 2020 9:26 am
by SkinnyOrc
In old school D&D, wilderness used to mean anything that wasn't a "dungeon" or an urban area like a town. Which of course meant that farmland was wilderness. So yeah, a much abused term. :)

Re: Definition of "Wilderness" for Monsters

Posted: Thu May 14, 2020 6:59 am
by HedgeWizard
Happy to see another solo player! I’ve been using a similar definition for some time. On top I like to have an idea of how populated it is around the towns and cities. Apparently during the Middle Ages only 5% of the population lived in urban locations. I don’t want my Titan to be too populated so I don’t go that far but do assume that about 4 times a town or city’s population lives within one day’s ride. So a small city of 5,000 will have about 20,000 people living around it in villages of between 250-500 people. Then as you get further away the number of settlements drops very quickly until you start approaching a new town or city.

I also keep my cities small (Blacksand closer to 5,000 than 10,000 and Arion only a bit bigger). With the big cities only found in the Old World.

It all helps the place feel more lived in for me.

Re: Definition of "Wilderness" for Monsters

Posted: Fri May 22, 2020 9:33 pm
by LordArioch
SkinnyOrc wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 9:26 am
In old school D&D, wilderness used to mean anything that wasn't a "dungeon" or an urban area like a town. Which of course meant that farmland was wilderness. So yeah, a much abused term. :)
This. Wilderness is a very broad, umbrella-term for that which is not bounded by walls, ceilings or similar impediments. IOW, that which is open to the sky, normally. Thus, "dungeon" could mean an artificial, subterranean space carved out by sentience, or even burrowing animal life, or a natural space like a cave, cavern, grotto, or the interiors of surface buildings, fortifications, etc. "Urban" is the middle of the Venn diagram sharing qualities of both, arguably.